News & information on Antarctica & the Southern Ocean
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Searching for the oldest ice on Earth in Antarctica

A team of scientists are searching for the oldest ice on earth – in East Antarctica, one of the most hostile environments on the planet.

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NASA’s Operation IceBridge completes one of its most successful Antarctic deployments to date

NASA’s Operation IceBridge is about to finish its eighth consecutive Antarctic deployment, and it’s looking like the 2016 season will be its most successful to date.

Type-C Killer whales commute long distances from Antarctica to temperate zones

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A team led by Regina Eisert of Gateway Antarctica at New Zealand's Canterbury University, has found that Type-C Killer Whales travel great distances from the Ross Sea to waters north of New Zealand.

Flying lab to study how the Southern Ocean absorbs carbon

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A team of scientists supported by the National Science Foundation (NSF) will be taking off in a specially-modified Gulfstream V jet this month as they survey remote parts of the Southern Ocean.

What is the Antarctic Treaty?

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The Antarctic Treaty applies to the entire region south of 60° South Latitude. It effectively stops nations from making territorial claims or from exploiting Antarctic resources.

Jonathan Bamber on Ice Sheets and Sea Level Rise [video]

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Professor Jonathan Bamber of the University of Bristol discusses the latest projections for global sea level rise, and how New Zealand will be affected.

Interim Ban on Tourists using Drones in Coastal Areas of Antarctica

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Unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) or drones are valuable scientific instruments in Antarctica but are not toys for tourists. That’s the ruling from the latest meeting of the International Association of Antarctica Tour Operators (IAATO). For the upcoming 2015-2016 season, the IAATO members have agreed not to allow the recreational use of drones in the coastal areas of Antarctica.

The US National Ice Center - naming Antarctic icebergs

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Icebergs are created when large chunks of freshwater ice break off Antarctic ice shelves or glaciers and calve into the Southern Ocean. To be classified as an iceberg, the ice extruding from the water must be at least five metres above sea level, be between 30-50 metres thick, and must cover an area of at least 500 square meters. Icebergs can have a direct effect on the sea bed, scouring the seafloor where it makes contact. But who monitors icebergs? And how big can they get?